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Chocolate Linzer Torte for Mother’s Day!

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Quick, quick, quick….you still have time to make this simple Chocolate Linzer Torte……for your mom, grandmom, aunt…or best neighbor for Mother’s Day…..It can be made today, tonight, or tomorrow…on Saturday….it holds well at room temperature for a couple of days….or you can refrigerate it…..but if it is refrigerated I would advise to put it in to a 300 F oven to warm and crisp it up before serving…. You can find the recipe and how to make it on Maja’s Kitchen Blog….. www.majaskitchen.com March 21, 2013 look for it in the Archives…

Tulips and ChocoAlmondCake 006I guarantee that to whom ever you will give it or serve it…they will be most delighted…with this extraordinary pastry…..Tulips go well with this cake….not to eat…but as a decor on the side….but roses will do as well….even little violets… We need to all make sure that we have a mother to spoil on this special weekend….my mom died 7 years ago…but I will make that cake to remember all the special times we have had together….and that I am forever grateful….


www.majaskitchen.com/Chocolate Linzer Torte

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If you have any questions or would like permission,

I can be contacted via email at: maria@majaskitchen.com   

Feel free to quote me,

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Maja’s Kitchen has moved…..

Kitchen 002

As you all know Maja’s Kitchen was a Cooking School at our home in the Baltimore, Maryland area which I ran for the past 25 years.

We owned a lovely big home and bought it in 1981 when we moved from Gilroy, California to Baltimore.

After a few years of redoing, decorating, totally designing and installing a new kitchen we decided that I should start a Home-Based Cooking School.

It was a wonderful time of learning about running a business that included bookkeeping, networking, advertising and just plain being cheerful about what I am doing and loving it.

When I think about the past years, I am amazed how many people I have met and so many of you became life-long friends, while we cooked, set tables, made flower arrangements, plated the food artistically, shared life histories, shared joys and sorrows and memories that kept us astonished and hysterical with laughter while recounting the times we were

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together. I am most grateful about having had all those times and friends in my life, but, the time has come when we had to give up our large home and move into a smaller one to make our life freer of the care a huge home demands.

However, Maja’s Kitchen is not ending at this time even though we now live in a Condominium at Mays Chapel, Timonium/Baltimore, Maryland.

I will continue with private classes, in my new kitchen or yours, making/baking and catering special occasion European cakes and pastries for holidays or for whatever celebration you might need at your dessert table, including Gingerbread Houses to decorate your Home for the Holidays.

Please contact me any time you feel an urge for something sweet….or…when  you want to surprise someone with a European Pastry that you might have had on one of your European travels.

Maja’s Kitchen LLC…is now located at:

Mays Chapel in Timonium/Baltimore. MD

12300 Rosslare Ridge Rd, #403

Timonium, MD, 21093

telephone has not changed…it is still – 410-561-1157

Email address: maria@majaskitchen.com

Website/Blog: www.majaskitchen.com

Please, contact me at any time….

 

If you have not joined me on FaceBook please do…since I communicate with my friends daily… Sending you all friendly wishes with a big hug..…

Maria/Maja

Maria R. Springer

 

 

 


Russian Easter Bread

Easter in Slavic families is

celebrated with a Babka or Kulic!

In Eastern and Central European Countries (like the area of the former Polish-Lihuanian Commonwealth, which includes Poland, Lithuania, Slovakia, Belarus, Ukraine, Western Russia and a part of northeastern Hungary) a special cake is prepared to celebrate Easter.  It is the Babka, also called Kulic, served with a cheese mixture that is called Paskha….

Babka or Kulic is a tall cylindrical sweet yeast cake.  It is flavored with rum soaked raisins, and candied fruit.  Sometimes Saffron is added to make the cake more yellow. However, I feel that the egg yolks give me enough yellow color therefore I do not add the Saffron.

I remember my grandmother adding saffron to her yeast cakes at Easter.  When I was a little girl I watched her making the cakes  and asked her why she added the red strings to the dough…she answered:  “Saffron macht den Kucha gel,”  speaking in her Swabian dialect.   (Saffron makes the cake yellow.)

This cylindrical cake when baked is traditionally crowned with a white icing, Royal Icing, and is sprinkled with chopped candied fruit and almonds.

Babka is also traditionally served with Paska, a creamy cheese mold.  It consists of a combination of sweetened Pot Cheese, or cottage cheese, nuts, mostly almonds and candied fruit. It is molded into a four sided pyramid, and decorated with nuts or candy to form the letters XB, which stands for “Christ is risen.”  Paskha is the traditional and classical accompaniment for this sweet  yeast bread, Babka, also called Kulic.

Paska

I make my Paska with a tub of whipped cream cheese and add:

Rum or brandy soaked chopped apricots – do not add the run or alcohol that the fruit has soaked in

1 Tbsp Candied lemon and orange peels

1 Tbsp Chopped almonds or hazelnuts

1 Tbsp chopped chocolate

1 tsp  Zest of a lemon

1 tsp Zest of an orange

1 tsp of either brandy or rum

Mix all the ingredients together and serve it in a bowl with the Babka,

or form the pyramid and design the letters XB on one side of the Paskha.

One can also add the letters XB on top of the Paska when served in a bowl.

Note:

If one does not like the alcohol…. brandy or rum flavoring can be added in stead,

1 tsp of either one.

The Easter Babka

To make it simple….

I sometimes serve the Babka with whipped cream cheese and home made jam!

Prepare the yeast:

2 pkg dry yeast

1 Tbsp sugar

1 ½ cups milk, warmed

1 cup flour

Warm the milk in a glass bowl in the microwave…to lukewarm. Gradually stir into the milk the two packets of dry yeast, sugar and the flour using a whisk or a fork whisking until the mixture is smooth.

Cover the mixture with a towel or plastic wrap and let it sit in a warm place until it doubles in bulk.

Ingredients for the cake batter

½ cup softened butter

1 cup of sugar

7 egg yolks

4 cups of flour

¼ tsp salt

Zest of one orange

2 tsp Vanilla

1 tsp Orange Flavoring

1 cup rum soaked raisins or craisins, discard the soaking alcohol

½ cup sliced almonds

In an Electric Mixer

Cream butter and sugar until very creamy and add the 7 egg yolks, one at a time and mixing well between each one.  Add the vanilla and the orange flavoring.  Mix well.

Add the risen yeast mixture and add the 4 cups of flour/salt mixture and beat well.  The dough will be quite soft.

Leave the dough in the mixing bowl, cover it with plastic wrap and, place it in a warm spot in your kitchen

to rise until it is double in bulk.

Baking the Babka

I have saved some of the metal coffee cans from the past and bake the Babka in them.  However you can bake it in a Bundt pan or Kugelhupf form or even in loaf pans.  It is, after all a breakfast bread.  But, if you are from Russian decent and want to be traditional, look and see if you have some old 2 pound metal coffee cans in some of your kitchen cabinets hidden away.

Whatever baking form you will use, you will probably need two of them, grease them; you do not need to dust them with flour and set them aside until the dough is risen and is ready to be baked.

While you wait…heat the oven to 350 F

When the dough has doubled in size, mix it gently and bring it down to almost the original bulk.

Fill each prepared baking form about half full with the dough, and let it rise again until it doubles in bulk.

Now place it into the pre-heated 350 F oven and bake the cake about 50 to 60 minutes, depending on your oven.

Watch that the top does not brown too quickly, if it does place a piece of foil over each of the cakes to slow down the browning.

At about 45 minutes into the baking time, I usually check the cakes with a thermometer to see if the cakes are close to be baked.   The thermometer needs to read between 190 F and 200 F to be completely baked.

When done, remove from the oven and place it on a rack to cool.

Do not take it out of the baking pans until it is almost completely cooled.   This is a very delicate cake it will break into pieces if taken out too soon.

When it is out of the baking pan let it completely cool before glazing it with Royal Icing.

Royal Icing

1 egg white

½ pound powdered sugar

2 Tbsp lemon juice

Place egg white and sugar into a mixing bowl and beat until very white in color and thick, but runny.

Now add the 2 Tbsp of lemon juice and mix again. The icing has to be thick but able to run down the sides of the cake. Place the cake onto a plate or platter to ice them, not on the platter that you will serve the cake on your buffet.

With a big spoon drop the icing on top of the cake and help it a little to run down the sides. The drips do not have to drip all the way to the bottom of the cake, but do not be too concerned when they do in some cases and puddles collect at the bottom.

When the icing is quite dry, I usually let it dry uncovered overnight on my kitchen counter.

Next day I gently lift it off the plate and place it on a pretty platter ready for the occasion I have planned it for.

Hope you have fun preparing wonderful, not too sweet, yeast bread that will go well with either tea or coffee and the rest of your Easter Breakfast.

Cutting and Serving the Babka

This cake can be cut into large rounds and then the rounds can be cut in half

Or………..it can be cut from the top down and then cut into little triangles.

The Babka can be made a couple weeks in advance because it freezes well, however the decoration with the Royal Icing needs to be done after the cake is thawed and before it is served.   I do it the night before the breakfast.  To freeze it I wrap the cake with three layers of plastic wrap before I place it into the freezer.

I wish you all a wonderful and Happy Easter!

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Copyright:

Maria Reisz Springer……..

Maja’s Kitchen LLC….

http://www.majaskitchen.com

maria@majaskitchen.com

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Unauthorized use, distribution, and/or duplication of proprietary material without prior approval is prohibited. If you have any questions or would like permission, I can be contacted via email at: maria@majaskitchen.com   Feel free to quote me, just give credit where credit is due, link to the recipe, and please send people to my website, http://www.majaskitchen.com

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This morning…

I woke up to a very nice surprise…

 

 

GH Dec 09 005

I received an email that my cheese cake recipe was included in the “Vanilla” story in http://www.nobility.org  blog….

Please, go to http://www.nobility.org/vanilla to read a most interesting history about Vanilla and find my cheese cake recipe as well…

Thank you… to the editors of Nobility and Analogous, Traditional Elites in the Allecutions of Pius XII.

I love that you took the time to test my recipe and came up with a very interesting idea…to make the crust with Amaretti di Saronno….an Italian cookie…. I can see that that would make my cheesecake even better…because Almonds in any form do enhance  cherries…or any cherry pastry….

Thank you…once again…for including one of my recipes in your blog stories…

I am honored….!

Maria Reisz Springer

Maja’s Kitchen LLC

http://www.majaskitchen.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Fasching’s Krapfen!

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In the Christian world….“Carnival is the period between Epiphany, January 6th and Ash Wednesday, given to…. all kinds of rejoicing, and in particular one experiences the pleasures of the table….”  according to “Larousse, Gastronomique”, an Encyclopedia of Food, Wine and Cookery.

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Carnivals are celebrated all over the world in all kinds of different ways, like masquerading to be someone one is not, or hiding behind a masque.  This also is the time when one experiences the best and happiest moments with special meals while gathering and enjoying friends around the table.   Every country enjoys it’s specialties and favorites during this time of celebration, and with it experiences the “last Hurrahhh ” before a somber, introverted and self-examining time that leads toward Easter.

I am not as familiar with other countries, but I have lived in Austria and Germany during my childhood and adult life, where I have experienced Fasching in its reality or should  I say non-reality and insanity!

As a budding teenager my first Fasching was a “Kinder Fasching’s Ball” in Kapfenberg, Austria.  My mother made a gipsy costume for me and off I went with my girlfriends to this big event.

It actually was very much like a  “youth school mixer” in today’s world.

One late Saturday afternoon in February we took off  to the Auditorium in Kapfenberg, Austria…where the Fasching’s Ball was held.  It was cold, snow had fallen all morning and we had to wear wool socks and heavy shoes, which of course did not go with our outfits, and we refused to wear coats, since the coats would crush our beautiful Fasching’s costumes. We decided to wear sweaters under our costumes, which made us look fat…horrors!   We had all the teenage problems of self-consciousness and youth.   But we overcame all our complaints, especially the freezing temperature by running most of the way to the “Kinder Fasching’s Ball” …to keep warm.

This was my first experience of being in a huge room with hundreds of children/youth and some adults.  I was totally overwhelmed.  It was dark and stuffy, people shouted, the music was blaring, and it was hard to stay with my friends. We kept being pushed apart and were constantly looking for each other.  I finally got completely lost and found myself frightened and close to tears.  Having been a person of quick decisions, even at that age, I found the door where we came in and left.  I ran all the way home, in the dark, having been sickened by fright to the point of fainting.  I had to, for the first time in my life, put all my strength together to put one foot in front of the other.  I got home totally exhausted and collapsed into my mother’s arms.  I never wanted to go to another Fasching’s Ball…..ever again!

The next Fasching’s Ball experience I had  when I spent my year at the University of Tuebingen in Germany.  It was given and held at the different Fraternity Houses.   Needless to say this too was quite an experience.  However, I was an adult and knew that if I did not drink, I would survive the evening.  I concentrated on checking out the buffet tables and explored the specialties of the chefs.  These tables were much more intriguing  than all the “rejoicing” that was going on around me.

In Austria this time of year is called Fasching, and being from Austrian heritage I want to tell you about a very special pastry which became known as the…

Fashings Krapfen 017

Faschings-Krapfe!

A Krapfe is simply a doughnut without a hole.  It originated in Vienna in 1615 and was created by Caecilie beim Peilertor, who was a “Luxusbaeckerin” a very creative, high-end pastry baker.  To honor her at that time these doughnuts were called “Cillikugeln” (Cilliballs), a derivative of her name,  and  30 years later they and she were again honored with being filled or eaten with Apricot Jam.  From then on Austrians cannot live without Apricot Jam!

It was at Fasching that engagements were announced during the 17th century with a custom that allowed the  girl to break a Krapfe in half and share it with the  young man who would be her betrothed.

Fashings Krapfen 008

There were many “Krapfen-Haeuser,” Doughnut houses, in Vienna, and its culinary archives tell us about a Fasching in 1815 when 10 million Krapfen were consumed during its celebration.

Doughnuts are also called “Bismarcks” in some parts of the U.S. and the Pennsylvania Dutch call them “Fastnacht Kuchen”

To help you celebrate the night before Ash Wednesday here is my family recipe for this wonderful pastry.  If you make them at home with your children and eat them with apricot jam you  just might start a new tradition in your family.

Maja’s Faschingskrapfen!

1 pkg dry yeast + 1/4 cup warm milk + 1 tsp  sugar + 10 min. = proofed yeast

3 1/2 cups flour

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 cup butter – melted

6 large eggs yolks – beaten + 2 tsp Vanilla

1 cup warm milk

Place all the above ingredients into an electric mixer and beat for 10 min. at medium speed.

Let the dough rise in the same bowl in a warm place, covered with plastic wrap.

When the dough has doubled in size punch it down and beat again – 5 min. – with the electric mixer.

Let the dough rise again till double in size.

Dust a surface with flour and pour dough onto it.  Knead it briefly and roll it into a ball.

Let the dough rest, covered with a cloth, for about 10 minutes.

Roll out the dough to a rectangular shape – about ½ inch thick.

Keep dusting the dough with flour because it might be sticky.  It is a very delicate dough ..therefor handle it gently.

Cut out 2 ½ inch round.

Let them rise – about 10 to 15 minutes while the peanut oil is being heated in a wok or a saucier.

Add 1 stick of butter to the oil for a special flavor…..this is optional.

The oil should be only 1 inch high in the pan. This pastry is not actually “deep” fried……..since it is important to achieve a white ring around the Krapfe when it is fried.  Also the oil needs to be on medium to low heat…..to cook this pastry slowly and to assure that they are cooked through.

Place Krapfen into the hot oil – floured side down and fry them till golden brown…..turn them once.

They should have a white stripe around them, and drain them on paper towels.

Sprinkle them with confectioner sugar …and enjoy them when they are still warm.

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To eat them the Austrian way…..is to break them in half with your fingers and dip them into the Apricot Jam on your plate!

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Maja’s Kitchen….

maria@majaskitchen.com

http://www.majaskitchen.com

Maja/Maria Reisz Springer

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Unauthorized use, distribution, and/or duplication of proprietary material without prior approval is prohibited. If you have any questions or would like permission, I can be contacted via email at: maria@majaskitchen.com   Feel free to quote me, just give credit where credit is due, link to the recipe, and please send people to my website, http://www.majaskitchen.com

Find me on… Face Book

LinkedIn and Pinterest

  

 

 

Winter !


This Winter has been long and often dreary which gave me plenty of opportunities to take my camera and paint portraits  and  landscapes of winter’s beauty, and it gave me moments of reflection that  strengthens, heals and uplifts the spirit.

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Years ago I received a little book from my husband that I have treasured through the years.  A few days ago as I was looking for inspiration for this blog story I found it on one of the shelves, opened the pages and could not stop reading the lovely words that touched my soul.   Sharing excerpts of some of the poems with you hopefully will be as  meaningful and uplifting for you as they are for me at this time in my life.

“The Poems of Dr. Zhivago”

by Boris Pasternak

Translated from the Russian by Eugene M. Kayden
Hallmark Editions 1967

Maine March 2012 053

Winter Night

The snow was falling, falling slow

From land to land,

A candle flamed upon a table;

A candle flamed.

 

As imidges of the summer swarm

Against a flame,

Outside the snowflakes swarmed against

The window pane.

The blizzard modeled on the glass

White spheres and arrows,

A candle flamed upon a table;

A candle flamed.

Maine March 2012 051

Holy Week

The dark of night lies everywhere,

So young the night, the square seems like

Eternity from end to end

Where still a thousand years must wait

The dawn of day and light.

2013-03-25 09.07.22

Meeting

The snow will bury roads

And houses to the roofs.

If I go to stretch my legs

I see you at my door.

2 day of snow Dec. 10 019

In a light fall coat, alone,

Without overshoes or hat,

You try to keep your calm,

sucking your snow-wet lips.

2 day of snow Dec. 10 010

The trees and fences draw

Far back into the gloom.

You watch the street, alone

Within the falling snow.

Your scarf hangs wet with snow,

Your collar and your sleeves,

and stars of melted flakes

Gleam dewy in your hair.

2 Valentines snow 024

A shining wisp of hair

Lights suddenly your face,

Your figure in the cold,

In that thin overcoat.

Flakes gleam beneath your lashes

And anguish in your eyes.

You were created whole,

A seamless shape of love.

1 GBH 1 Snow 047It seems as if your image

Drawn fine with pointed steel

Is now in silver lines

Cut deep within my heart.

Forever there you live

In your true humility.

It does not really matter

If the world is hard as stone.

2 Valentines snow 018I feel I am your double,

Like you outside, in dark.

I cannot draw the line

Dividing you from me.

For who are we, and whence,

If their idle talk alone

Lives long in aftertime

When we on longer live?

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Home Spring 2006 024

Spring with all its glory will be here soon!

Let us be patient with a grateful heart~

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Maja’s Kitchen….

http://www.majaskitchen.com

Maja/Maria Reisz Springer

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Unauthorized use, distribution, and/or duplication of proprietary material without prior approval is prohibited. If you have any questions or would like permission, I can be contacted via email at: maria@majaskitchen.com   Feel free to quote me, just give credit where credit is due, link to the recipe, and please send people to my website, http://www.majaskitchen.com

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The Pear….


The “Incom-pear-able”

Sweet Fruit!

It was a very hot summer day when the air stood still and made me feel as if I was suspended in a bubble.  My body felt heavy;  lifting my arms was difficult.  For the first time in my life I was completely aware of my body not functioning properly.

While crossing the  lawn at  the back of my grandparents’  home,  I felt a breeze touch my cheeks and a sigh of relieve came with my next breath, it made me  walk  quicker to get into the shade of a big pear tree in the corner of the yard.

Looking up into it’s fruit laden branches with the sun blinding my eyes I could  see the branches silhouetted against the sky in a dark mass of bending lines.  The leaves looked pale in the bright light and reflecting the occasional water droplet still waiting to be evaporated by the sun’s rays.

The golden pears were hanging off the branches like bags of gold, so heavy that they seemed ready to break loose any moment.  One fell to the ground splattering its juices like a fountain.  It fell just in front of my feet covering me with its sweet and fruity flesh.  Scraping up the incredible sweetness off the ground and filling my mouth with its goodness made me feel thirsty for more. I was only seven years old.

There are over five  thousand varieties of pears grown throughout the world in temperate climates.

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The best tasting pears come from France, and in the United States most of the crops come from California, Oregon and Washington.  Pares range in shape from spherical to bell-shaped, and in color from celadon green to golden-yellow to tawny red.  Ripe pears are juicy and  depending on the variety, can range in flavor from spicy to sweet and to tart-sweet.

The pear is easily bruised and therefore is better if it is picked green.  The flavor will improve when you let it ripen at room temperature and then

food pictures 034

refrigerate the ripened fruit.

Buying Pears In The Grocery Store

Choose pears that are fragrant and free of blemishes and soft spots.  It is not necessary to peel the pear before eating, but if it is peeled  then brush it with lemon juice, as the pear’s flesh quickly discolored.

For Cooking, choose fruit that is still quite firm

Bartlett  is the most commonly found pear in the United States and therefore most popular.  Its season is from late July through October.  The pear was developed in the 18th century by and an Englishman and introduced to America by Dorchester, Massachusett’s resident Enoch Bartlett.

Comice  is the best pear for eating; it is fine-textured and has a juicy flesh with an aroma similar to wine.  The best Comice pears come from Oregon and northern California. They are available from October to January.

Bosc  is a winter pear and the most practical to cook with.  It’s russet color will yellow somewhat when completely ripe, but will not soften like other pears.  To test for ripeness squeeze the long, graceful neck for tenderness.  When fully ripe it is very sweet and full of fragrance.  It holds its shape well when baked or poached.  It is available from October through April.

D’Anjou  is widely grown in the US.  It is the least flavorful of all the pears, but it keeps the longest.  It is available throughout the winter months, from October through mid-winter and is very good for cooking.

One of my favorite cakes is the ……

Austrian Pear Cake!

Our Austrian friends in Kapfenberg, Steiermark, often invited us on Sundays for Nachmittag’s Kaffee, Afternoon Coffee.  The Keffee and Kuchen, Coffee and Cake, was served in an Arbor, shading us from the afternoon’s son.   On one of those Sunday’s Tante Paula, Aunt Paula, serve a Birnen Kuchen, a Pear Cake.

Many years later here in America  I came upon this Pear Cake recipe in a German Magazine, and it has become one of my very favorite cakes.  Every time I make it I remember fondly the kindness and love these friends extended to us, the refugee family from Croatia.

Birnen Kuchen

Pear Cake

3/4 cup unsalted butter at room temperature

1 cup sugar

2 large eggs

zest of  1 to 2 lemons – depending on the size of the lemons

1 tsp Vanilla

2 1/2 cups flour

2 tsp Baking Powder

1/2 cup milk

and

2 lbs of Bartlett pears (about 4 to 6 medium size)

Optional  Glaze

1 cup powdered sugar

4 Tbsp Triple sect, or juice of 1 lemon

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Set the oven at 350 F

Prepare an eight inch spring form by greasing and dusting it with flour.

Peal the pears and slice each quarter into three sections.

In an electric mixer or hand mixer beat the butter and sugar until very light in color, and very fluffy.  Add the eggs  one at a time.  Add the zest of the lemons and Vanilla.  Mix the flour with the baking powder.  Add the flour mixture to the butter, sugar and eggs alternating with the milk.   Mix well until it becomes a smooth, soft dough.

Transfer half of the dough to the spring form and smooth it onto the bottom of this baking pan.

Add half of  the pear sections in a circle starting  around the outer edge of the pan until you finish in the middle.

Add the rest of the dough on top of the pears, smooth it out and add another layer of the pears on top…the same way in a circle until you finish in the center.    Be generous with the pears it make the cake pudding-like, moist and delicious.

Bake the cake at 350 F for about 1 hour and 15 minutes…..or until a toothpick come out clean.

Cool the cake completely then transfer it onto a serving platter.

There are several options to glaze the cake:

Make the Lemon Glaze with the above recipe…..it is really delicious.

Softly whipped heavy cream sweetened with powdered sugar….before serving.

Or………..

Drizzle the cake slices with honey just before serving.

I have tried all three versions, and I cannot tell which one I like best…..actually it all depends on what you have in the refrigerator or the pantry………..I have not tried dribbling a warm chocolate sauce over the slices , but I think I will try it the next time I make this wonderful and versatile  cake. Because with each topping it actually becomes another pastry.  If you make the cake a day ahead to be served …you can leave it on the kitchen counter – covered loosely with wax paper.

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Maja’s Kitchen….

http://www.majaskitchen.com

Maja/Maria Reisz Springer

Share with me one of your favorite fruit pastries….

It would be lovely to hear from you!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Unauthorized use, distribution, and/or duplication of proprietary material without prior approval is prohibited. If you have any questions or would like permission, I can be contacted via email at: maria@majaskitchen.com   Feel free to quote me, just give credit where credit is due, link to the recipe, and please send people to my website, http://www.majaskitchen.com

Find me on Face Book

LinkedIn

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